Wednesday, November 9, 2016

The Day After

Like so many, I'm mired in grief and shock at Hillary's loss to The Donald.  But that won't stop me from spitting out a few thoughts:

--I'm not moving to Canada.

--The last time I was this upset following an election I was 17 and Ronald Reagan had clobbered Jimmy Carter and I feared imminent nuclear annihilation.  So far Trump has annihilated decency, and we'll see what else he gets his short fingers on in the months to come.

--I strongly suspected that Melania was going to divorce Donald minutes after the election.  Now she's stuck with him.

--If I were any sort of a business person, I'd start printing "Don't Blame Me, I Voted for Hillary" bumper stickers.

--I called my 81-year-old mother this morning, and she said, "I feel like I've lost my country."  I responded, "That's how Trump supporters felt."  We've heard much about the economic fears of Trumpians, but I believe the cultural fears were just as important.  Many Americans didn't recognize their country after a black president, a female presidential candidate, gay marriage and transgender people being spoken of, let alone given rights.  As commentator Van Jones said, this was a white-lash.  And it's given the rest of us whiplash.

--Remind me.  When's his rape trial?

--This statement from the leader of the National Center for Lesbian Rights pretty much sums up my feelings about Trump and where we go from here:


By a slim margin, this nation has elected a demagogue who trafficked in bigotry, stoked racist hatred and normalized misogyny. The election of Donald Trump as President threatens basic principles of human dignity and justice. Many of our most cherished values—inclusion, honoring difference, embracing equality, dismantling oppressive systems—are in jeopardy, but we will not be deterred. This is the moment we are called to resist. We are about to be tested as never before, and speaking for myself, and NCLR, we will not stand down, sit idle or be silent in the face of oppression, bullying or threat. This election result is devastating for our nation and especially for the most vulnerable. But we will fight on and will never give up. We must be the ones we are waiting for. Together, we fight on and we fight back. We must harness our grief, fear and outrage and serve justice.


--This morning I spotted in my living room a spider with at least 45 legs and a body the size of a Subaru.  It would've been easy, maybe even cathartic, to smash the hell out of it, but I took it outside, a small but conscious act of kindness that seems called for right now.  Of course, if the spider returns inside, all bets are off.

--With life promising to get harder for all minorities, it's especially incumbent on the LGBT community to continue to build and maintain bonds with other groups.  We must be a united front against a common orange enemy, and his supporters, the orange drops.

--Again, I'm not moving to Canada.  It's a lovely place and I have Canadian relatives who would make me welcome, but I choose to stay and fight.  Please join me.